Last edited by Tojagul
Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | History

2 edition of On the continuity of English prose from Alfred to More and his school. found in the catalog.

On the continuity of English prose from Alfred to More and his school.

R. W. Chambers

On the continuity of English prose from Alfred to More and his school.

An extract from the introduction to Nicholas Harpsfield"s life of Sir Thomas More

by R. W. Chambers

  • 195 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by Published for the Early English Text Society by the Oxford University Press in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • More, Thomas, -- Sir, Saint, -- 1478-1535.,
  • English prose literature -- Early modern, 1500-1700.

  • Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPR767 C5 1950
    The Physical Object
    Pagination45-174p.
    Number of Pages174
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15555748M

    Audio Books & Poetry Community Audio Computers, Technology and Science Music, Arts & Culture News & Public Affairs Non-English Audio Spirituality & Religion Librivox Free Audiobook ROSSO - Ardente KyA3g5 Radio Stations APR: the Podcast Matt & Eric's Uninteresting Podcast Homeschool Inspired LifeXperienceTalk Designtarinoita. On the Continuity of English Prose from Alfred to More and his School. EETS o.s. A. London: Oxford University Press, In The Book and the Magic of Reading in the Middle Ages. Ed. Albrecht Classen. “Hali Meiðhad, Sawles Warde, and the Continuity of English Prose.” In Five Hundred Years of Words and Sounds: A Festschrift for.

    The continuity of native verse and prose was never really broken, and just as the English race was at last to absorb its foreign conquerors, and to gain infinitely more than it had suffered from them, so English language and literature were by the same means to be enriched and ennobled to an extent no one then looking on could have dreamed of. See R. W. Chambers, On the Continuity of English Prose from Alfred to More and his School (London, ), pp. xcii—c, esp. p. xciii: “England was remarkable for the number of its hermits and recluses, a fact which is the cause of the composition of so much English prose: the fact that women recluses would not be expected to be as.

    Chambers, R.W. (); On the Continuity of English Prose from Alfred to More and His School; Oxford: Early English Text Society. (A useful study highlighting the essential continuity of the Old English prose tradition into Middle English times, despite the Norman Conquest.).   No matter how limited his personal literacy may have been, Alfred did sponsor it in others, and even as his own reading was mediated by more educated assistants, Alfred in turn mediated the reading of his subjects. In the Prose Psalms and their Old English introductions, Alfred models Anglo-Saxon textual production on Old Testament patterns of Cited by: 1.


Share this book
You might also like
Barton R. Baker.

Barton R. Baker.

book of Revelation.

book of Revelation.

effects of large carnivores on livestock and animal husbandry in Marsabit District, Kenya

effects of large carnivores on livestock and animal husbandry in Marsabit District, Kenya

Business plan 2004/2007.

Business plan 2004/2007.

British co-operation

British co-operation

Speculations on doubling in Shakespeares plays.

Speculations on doubling in Shakespeares plays.

Cumulative analytical index of the volumes of Summaries of the meetings and the resolutions of the Permanent Council, 1970-1986.

Cumulative analytical index of the volumes of Summaries of the meetings and the resolutions of the Permanent Council, 1970-1986.

AIDS

AIDS

Social work in rural communities

Social work in rural communities

From Puvis de Chavannes to Matisse and Picasso

From Puvis de Chavannes to Matisse and Picasso

Ophthalmic goods & services.

Ophthalmic goods & services.

Sex discrimination at work

Sex discrimination at work

Collaborative planning in the coastal zone

Collaborative planning in the coastal zone

Off the bench

Off the bench

Department of Social and Health Services contracts management study

Department of Social and Health Services contracts management study

On the continuity of English prose from Alfred to More and his school by R. W. Chambers Download PDF EPUB FB2

On the continuity of English prose from Alfred to More and his school. London, Pub. for the Early English Text Society by H. Milford, Oxford University Press, (OCoLC) Online version: Chambers, R.W.

(Raymond Wilson), On the continuity of English prose from Alfred to More and his school. Get this from a library. On the continuity of English prose from Alfred to More and his school.

[R W Chambers]. Read the full-text online edition of On the Continuity of English Prose from Alfred to More and His School: An Extract from the Introduction to Nicholas Harpsfield's Life of Sir Thomas More (). Home» Browse» Books» Book details, On the Continuity of English Prose from Alfred to.

On the Continuity of English Prose from Alfred to More and his School (an extract from the introduction to OS ) (Early English Text Society Original Series) [Chambers, R.W.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. On the Continuity of English Prose from Alfred to More and his School (an extract from the introduction to OS ) (Early English Text Society Original Series)Format: Hardcover.

On the continuity of English prose from Alfred to More and his school: An extract from the introd. to Nicholas Harpsfield's Life of Sir Thomas More Society. [Publications]. Original series) [Chambers, R. W] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

On the continuity of English prose from Alfred to More and his school: An extract from the introd. to Nicholas Harpsfield's Life of Author: R. W Chambers. On the continuity of English prose: from Alfred to More and his school / by R.

Chambers An extract from the introduction to Nicholas harpsfield's Life of Sir Thomas More edited by E. Hitchcock and R. Chambers. Main Author: Chambers, R. (Raymond Wilson), Published. On the Continuity of English Prose from Alfred to More and His School 作者: Chambers, Raymond Wilson 编 出版年: 页数: 定价: $ ISBN: On the continuity of english prose from alfred to more and his school Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Please, subscribe or login to access all content. Buy On the Continuity of English Prose from Alfred to More and his School (an extract from the introduction to OS ) (Early English Text Society Original Series) by R.W.

Chambers (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders. On the Continuity of English Prose from Alfred to More and His School, London, Early English Text Society/Oxford University Press, Chapters on the Exeter Book, London, Percy Lund, Humphries & Co.

Ltd. ; Thomas More, London, Cape, The Place of St. Thomas More in English Literature and History, London, Longman,   The Continuity of English Prose from Alfred to More and his School. An extract from the introduction to Nicholas Harpsfield’s Life of Thomas More edited by E.

Hitchcock and R. Chambers. EETS: Oxford UP. Deanesly, Margaret. “Vernacular Books in England in the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries.”. Author of Thomas More, On the continuity of English prose from Alfred to More and his school, Beowulf, Man's unconquerable mind, The saga and the myth of Sir Thomas More, Poets and their critics, Widsith, The Jacobean Shakespeare and Measure for measure.

On the Continuity of English Prose from Alfred to More and His School: An Extract from the Introduction to Nicholas Harpsfield's Life of Sir Thomas More By R. Chambers Oxford University Press, "The Continuity of English Prose From Alfred to More and His School." In The Life and Death of Sir Thomas More, Knight, Sometimes Lord High Chancellor of England.

London: Oxford University Press. His theory was completely rejected in by R.W. Chambers in his On the Continuity of English Prose from Alfred to More and his School, which has remained the most influential book on the subject2. It attempted to show that there was an unbroken line of development from Old English prose to.

The Continuity of English Prose from Alfred to More and his School. An extract from the introduction to Nicholas Harpsfield’s Life of Thomas More edited by E. Hitchcock and R. Chambers. EETS: Oxford UP. Deanesly, Margaret. “Vernacular. On the Continuity of English Prose from Alfed to More and His School 1 copy A book of London English / ed.

by R. Chambers and Marjorie 1 copy. English Alliterative Verse tells the story of the medieval poetic tradition that includes Beowulf, Piers Plowman, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, stretching from the eighth century, when English poetry first appeared in manuscripts, to the sixteenth century, when alliterative poetry ceased to be by: 8.

The scholar R. Chambers wrote a study entitled On the Continuity of English Prose from Alfred to More and His School; since that “school” can be taken to include John Milton and the great historians of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries then the influence of Alfred has been wide indeed.

In the words of Chambers himself, “it became. Alfred the Great (Old English: Ælfrēd, Ælfrǣd, 'Elf-counsel' or 'Wise-elf'; between and – 26 October ) was King of Wessex from to c. and King of the Anglo-Saxons from c. to He was the youngest son of King Æthelwulf of father died when he was young and three of Alfred's brothers, Æthelbald, Æthelberht and Æthelred, reigned in turn before : –, Wantage, Berkshire.

Chambers, R. W. On the Continuity of English Prose from Alfred to More and His School. London: Chambers agrees with Krapp concerning the nature of the essential English prose tradition (clarity and intelligibility, simplicity and directness), but he traces this tradition back to.ally know it.

It is significant that Dr. Owst in his introduction felt a compulsion to write a defense of his theme. A few of his remarks I R. W. Chambers, "The Continuity of English Prose from Alfred to More and His School," Early English Text Society, No.

(London, ), p. cxlix. See also pp. exxv, clxvii.r. w. chambers, Thomas More (Westminster, Md. ), esp. "Epilogue: More's Place in History"; The Place of St. Thomas More in English Literature and History (London ); On the Continuity of English Prose from Alfred to More and His School (Early English Text Society A; ).

r.